VIETNAM - Central Highlands, Dung K'No
VIETNAM - Central Highlands, Dung K'No
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, VIETNAM - Central Highlands, Dung K'No
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, VIETNAM - Central Highlands, Dung K'No

VIETNAM - Central Highlands, Dung K'No

Regular price
£5.95
Sale price
£5.95
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Tax included.

  

Country: Vietnam

Varietal:  Catamor

Process:  Washed and dried on patios

Altitude: 1500 m above sea level

Region:  Central Highlands

Flavours: Creamy, molasses, apple


This very special lot of coffee, come from a group of smallholder Arabica producers in the central highlands of Vietnam, known as the K'No people. Coffee was introduced to Vietnam in the 1800's, and was mainly grown on many French owned colonial plantations. Due to a variety of political and economical factors, in the 1990's coffee production in Vietnam began to grow at a very fast pace. Vietnam now takes the second place in the world for coffee producing, behind Brazil.
This Arabica coffee is produced in the Central Highlands of Vietnam in the Lam Dong region, where the K'No people are located. The Dung K'No , is a commune of around 500 households, for whom the main source of income is agriculture, with coffee production the only source of income.


The main variety of Arabica grown is Catimor, originally chosen for its adaption to local climates and local altitude. The quality of this lot results form careful cultivation and harvesting, with processing managed with a scrupulous eye to detail and quality control. The coffee cherries are hand-picked, with each gathering undergoing stringent quality control and selection. The quality and clarity of each cherry is recorded with premiums paid for the finest cherries. The complex and careful processing continues with the use of specially tailored water tanks, followed by flotation methods to eliminate empty or less desirable cherries. Then it is onto an eco-friendly de-pulper,, known for its reduced water consumption. On completion of processing and drying, the coffee is cupped according to the strictest of protocols, with only the best profiles making into the consumers cup. This really is an exquisite lot.


It is worth mentioning the social benefits that are also embedded in the practices of these small farm holders and their partners. A nursery school has been built, to allow parents time to work and or adequately manage their coffee farms. Education and training is also afforded to encourage young people to enter into the coffee industry, as well as gender initiatives which have improved local women's capacity to contribute to farming and business decisions.


The meticulous cultivation, harvesting and tedious care taken to produce this coffee ensures that consumers are afforded an exceptional cup that is abundant in flavour. This bean works very well for espresso or coffee machines and also creates a great, strong bodied filter when brewed.